Blog

Are brief interventions for emotional disorders efficacious?

Effect of a brief ACT protocol focused on dismantling dysfunctional patterns of worry and rumination

*(Mas abajo encontrará la versión en español)*

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), emotional disorders have the highest prevalence within psychological disorders and are the main cause of request for psychological or psychiatric treatment worldwide (WHO, 2017). Within this type of disorders, unipolar depression and generalized anxiety disorders (GAD) are the most prevalent. Specifically, depression is considered by the WHO as the main cause of disability (WHO, 2018). GAD is considered a chronic disorder and shows a comorbidity with depression up to 80% (Judd et al., 1998; Lamers et al., 2011). The comorbidity between both disorders is associated with a worse prognosis, higher rates of recovery, and economical costs for the health systems (Wittchen, 2002). Accordingly, developing brief and efficacious psychological interventions for this type of disorders is especially important and economically worthwhile (WHO, 2016).

In this blog entry, we present a recently published study that was conducted in the Clinik Lab (Clinical Psychology Laboratory of Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz, Colombia: http://cliniklab.konradlorenz.edu.co/). The reference of the paper is the following and can be downloaded here:

Ruiz, F. J., Flórez, C. L., García-Martín, M. B., Monroy-Cifuentes, A., Barreto-Montero, K., García-Beltrán, D. M., Riaño-Hernández, D., Sierra, M. A., Suárez-Falcón, J. C., Cardona-Betancourt, V., & Gil-Luciano, B. (2018, en prensa). A multiple-baseline evaluation of a brief acceptance and commitment therapy protocol focused on repetitive negative thinking for moderate emotional disorders. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science.

            This study is the second one in a research line that aims to design and empirically evaluate brief protocols based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT; Hayes, Strosahl y Wilson, 1999; Wilson y Luciano, 2002) focused on dismantling dysfunctional patterns of worry and rumination. This research line is developed in a jointly effort by the Clinik Lab, the Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology and the Research Group of Experimental and Applied Analysis of Behavior at Universidad de Almería.

            Excessive worry and rumination is common in emotional disorders, especially in depression and GAD. Both processes have been included under the term repetitive negative thinking (RNT; Ehring y Watkins, 2008). In a first study, Ruiz, Riaño-Hernández, Suárez-Falcón y Luciano (2016) suggested that RNT is an especially pernicious experiential avoidance strategy because it used to: (a) be the first to put in practice in reaction to thoughts and emotions with aversive functions, (b) lead to the maintenance and amplification of discomfort, and this (c) leads the individual to put in practice additional experiential avoidance strategies. Additionally, Ruiz et al. (2016) suggested that triggers for RNT used to be hierarchically organized in a way that some more abstract triggers contain other more concrete triggers (Gil-Luciano, Calderón-Hurtado, Tovar, Sebastián y Ruiz, en revisión; Luciano, 2017). This led to suggest that intervention directed to the trigger at the top of the hierarchy can be especially efficacious according to the Relational Frame Theory (RFT; Hayes, Barnes-Holmes y Roche, 2001) research related with the transformation of functions through hierarchical relations (Gil, Luciano, Ruiz y Valdivia-Salas, 2012). In the abovementioned study, Ruiz et al. (2016) found that a 1-session ACT protocol directed to change the discriminative function of the hierarchical trigger for RNT obtained a substantial reduction of the dysfunctional patterns of worry and rumination in participants with mild to moderate emotional symptoms. You can read a blog entry summarizing the paper here.

            In the second study, Ruiz et al. (2018) analyzed the efficacy of a 2-session ACT protocol focused on dismantling RNT patterns in moderate emotional disorders. A multiple-baseline design across 10 participants was conducted. Participants could be categorized mainly within the depression and GAD categories. The intervention led to clinically significant changes (CSC) in emotional symptoms in 9 participants. Likewise, it was obtained CSC in reducing pathological worry, experiential avoidance, and cognitive fusion in 9 out of 10 participants. All participants showed CSC in the reduction of RNT, whereas 8 showed it in measures of valued actions. Lastly, the effect size of the intervention were very large (emotional symptoms: d = 2.44 and 2.68; pathological worry: d = 3.14; experiential avoidance: d = 1.32; cognitive fusion: d = 2.01; RNT: d = 2.51; and valued actions: d = 1.51 and 1.41). Figure 1 shows a summary of the results with each of the dependent variables of the study.  

FigBlog

Figure 1. Mean scores of participants in each of the dependent variables of the study during baseline (-5w to -1w) and intervention (1w to 12w), where w means a week. AAQ-II = experiential avoidance; CFQ = cognitive fusion; DASS-Total = emotional symptoms; GHQ-12 = emotional symptoms; PSWQ = pathological worry; PTQ = repetitive negative thinking; VQProg = Progress in values; VQObst = Obstruction in values.  

In conclusion, brief ACT protocols focused on RNT can be very efficacious in the treatment of emotional disorders. However, testing and improving these protocols is needed. Currently, in other finished and ongoing studies, we are analyzing the effect of this type of protocols in severe emotional disorders, children depression, gifted children with scholar problems, and schizophrenia. Likewise, the effect of the protocol used in this study is being evaluated in a large randomized controlled trial, and we are developing and testing an online intervention for emotional disorders.

The supplementary material of this article can be found at: https://osf.io/v48r6/. The complete protocol in Spanish is at https://osf.io/39db4/, whereas the English translation is at https://osf.io/kfb9u/.

References

Ehring, T., & Watkins, E. R. (2008). Repetitive negative thinking as a transdiagnostic process. International Journal of Cognitive Therapy1, 192-205.

Gil, E., Luciano, C., Ruiz, F. J., & Valdivia-Salas, S. (2012). A preliminary demonstration of transformation of functions through hierarchical relations. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 12, 1-20.

Gil-Luciano, B., Calderón-Hurtado, T., Tovar, D., Sebastián, B., & Ruiz, F. J. (en revisión). How are triggers for repetitive negative thinking organized? A relational frame analysis.

Hayes, S. C., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Roche, B. (2001). Relational frame theory. A post-Skinnerian account of human language and cognition. New York: Kluwer Academic Press.

Hayes, S. C., Strosahl, K. D., & Wilson, K. G. (1999). Acceptance and commitment therapy. An experiential approach to behavior change. New York: Guilford Press.

Judd, L. L., Akiskal, H. S., Maser, J. D., Zeller, P. J., Endicott, J., Coryell, W., & Rice, J. A. (1998). Major depressive disorder: A prospective study of residual subthreshold depressive symptoms as predictor of rapid relapse. Journal of Affective Disorders50, 97-108.

Lamers, F., Va Oppen, P., Comijs, H. C., Smit, J. H., Spinhoven, P., Van Balkom, A. J., & Penninx, B. W. (2011). Comorbidity patterns of anxiety and depressive disorders in a large cohort study: The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry72, 341-348.

Luciano, C. (2017). The self and responding to the own’s behavior. Implications of coherence and hierarchical framing. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 17, 267-275.

Ruiz, F. J., Flórez, C. L., García-Martín, M. B., Monroy-Cifuentes, A., Barreto-Montero, K., García-Beltrán, D. M., Riaño-Hernández, D., Sierra, M. A., Suárez-Falcón, J. C., Cardona-Betancourt, V., & Gil-Luciano, B. (2018, en prensa). A multiple-baseline evaluation of a brief acceptance and commitment therapy protocol focused on repetitive negative thinking for moderate emotional disorders. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science.

Ruiz, F. J., Riaño-Hernández, D., Suárez-Falcón, J. C., & Luciano, C. (2016). Effect of a one-session ACT protocol in disrupting repetitive negative thinking: A randomized multiple-baseline design. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 16, 213-233.

Wilson, K. G., & Luciano, C. (2002). Terapia de Aceptación y Compromiso. Un tratamiento conductual orientado a los valores [Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. A values-oriented behabioral treatment]. Madrid: Pirámide.

Wittchen, H. U. (2002). Generalized anxiety disorder: Prevalence, burden, and cost to society. Depression and Anxiety, 16, 162-171.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

¿Son eficaces las intervenciones breves en trastornos emocionales?

Efecto de un protocolo breve de ACT centrado en desmantelar patrones disfuncionales de rumia y preocupación

Según la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS), los trastornos emocionales cuentan con la mayor prevalencia dentro de los trastornos psicológicos y son la principal causa de solicitud de tratamiento psicológico y psiquiátrico a nivel mundial (OMS, 2017). Dentro de este grupo de trastornos destacan la depresión unipolar y el trastorno de ansiedad generalizada (TAG). Concretamente, la depresión es considerada por la OMS como la principal causa de incapacidad (OMS, 2018). Por su parte, el TAG es considerado un trastorno crónico y muestra una comorbilidad de hasta el 80% con la depresión (Judd et al., 1998; Lamers et al., 2011). La comorbilidad entre ambos trastornos se asocia con un peor pronóstico en el tratamiento, mayores tasas de recaída y costos para los sistemas de salud (Wittchen, 2002). Por esta razón, desarrollar intervenciones psicológicas breves y eficaces para este tipo de trastornos es especialmente importante y rentable económicamente (OMS, 2016).

En esta entrada del blog presentamos un estudio recientemente publicado que fue realizado en el Clinik Lab (Laboratorio de Psicología Clínica de la Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz, Colombia: http://cliniklab.konradlorenz.edu.co/). La referencia del artículo es la siguiente y puede descargarse aquí

Ruiz, F. J., Flórez, C. L., García-Martín, M. B., Monroy-Cifuentes, A., Barreto-Montero, K., García-Beltrán, D. M., Riaño-Hernández, D., Sierra, M. A., Suárez-Falcón, J. C., Cardona-Betancourt, V., & Gil-Luciano, B. (2018, en prensa). A multiple-baseline evaluation of a brief acceptance and commitment therapy protocol focused on repetitive negative thinking for moderate emotional disorders. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science.

            Este estudio supone un segundo paso en una línea investigación que tiene como objetivo diseñar y evaluar empíricamente protocolos breves basados en la Terapia de Aceptación y Compromiso (ACT; Hayes, Strosahl y Wilson, 1999; Wilson y Luciano, 2002) centrados en desmantelar patrones disfuncionales de preocupación y rumia. Dicha línea de investigación se desarrolla en un esfuerzo conjunto entre el Clinik Lab, el Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology y el Grupo de Investigación en Análisis Experimental y Aplicado del Comportamiento de la Universidad de Almería.

La rumia y preocupación excesivas son un denominador común en los trastornos emocionales, especialmente en la depresión y TAG. Ambos procesos han sido englobados recientemente bajo el término pensamiento negativo repetitivo (PNR; Ehring y Watkins, 2008). En un primer estudio, Ruiz, Riaño-Hernández, Suárez-Falcón y Luciano (2016) propusieron que el PNR es una estrategia de evitación experiencial especialmente perniciosa porque suele: (a) ser la primera en ponerse en práctica ante la presencia de pensamientos y emociones con funciones aversivas, (b) dar lugar al mantenimiento y amplificación del malestar, y esto (c) lleva a la persona a poner en práctica estrategias adicionales de evitación experiencial. Adicionalmente, Ruiz et al. (2016) propusieron que los disparadores de PNR suelen organizarse de manera jerárquica, de modo que unos disparadores más abstractos contienen a otros más concretos (Gil-Luciano, Calderón-Hurtado, Tovar, Sebastián y Ruiz, en revisión; Luciano, 2017). Esto llevó a sugerir que las intervenciones dirigidas al disparador de PNR en la cúspide de la jerarquía pueden ser especialmente eficaces de acuerdo con la investigación en Teoría del Marco Relacional (TMR; Hayes, Barnes-Holmes y Roche, 2001) relacionada con la transformación de funciones a través de relaciones jerárquicas (Gil, Luciano, Ruiz y Valdivia-Salas, 2012). En el mencionado estudio, Ruiz et al. (2016) encontraron que un protocolo de 1 sesión de ACT dirigido a cambiar la función discriminativa del disparador jerárquico de PNR dio lugar a una reducción sustancial de los patrones disfuncionales de rumia y preocupación en participantes con síntomas emocionales de leves a moderados. Aquí puedes leer una entrada de blog que reseña esta investigación.

En este segundo estudio, Ruiz et al. (2018) evaluaron la eficacia de un protocolo de 2 sesiones de ACT centrado en desmantelar patrones de PNR en trastornos emocionales moderados. Con este objetivo, se realizó un diseño de línea base múltiple entre 10 participantes que podrían categorizarse, principalmente, dentro de las categorías de depresión y TAG. La intervención dio lugar a cambios clínicamente significativos (CCS) en síntomas emocionales en 9 participantes. Asimismo, se obtuvieron CCS en la reducción de la preocupación patológica, evitación experiencial y fusión cognitiva en 9 de los 10 participantes. Todos los participantes mostraron CCS en la reducción de PNR, mientras que 8 lo hicieron en medidas de actuación valiosa. Finalmente, los tamaños del efecto de la intervención fueron muy grandes: síntomas emocionales: d = 2.44 y 2.68; preocupación patológica: d = 3.14; evitación experiencial: d = 1.32; fusión cognitiva: d = 2.01; PNR: d = 2.51; y conductas valiosas: d = 1.51 y 1.41). En la Figura 1 puede verse un resumen global de los resultados para todas las variables dependientes del estudio.

FigBlog

Figura 1. Resultados promedio de los participantes en cada una de las variables dependientes del estudio durante la Línea Base (-5w a -1w) y tras la intervención (1w a 12 w), donde w hace mención a semana. AAQ-II = evitación experiencial; CFQ = fusión cognitiva; DASS-Total = síntomas emocionales; GHQ-12 = síntomas emocionales; PSWQ = preocupación patológica; PTQ = pensamiento negativo repetitivo; VQProg = Progreso en valores; VQObst = Obstrucción en valores.  

En conclusión, los protocolos breves de ACT centrados en PNR pueden ser considerablemente eficaces en el tratamiento de trastornos emocionales. Sin embargo, es necesario seguir poniendo a prueba y perfeccionando estos protocolos. Actualmente, en otros estudios finalizados y en curso, estamos analizando el efecto de este tipo de protocolos de ACT en trastornos emocionales severos, depresión infantil, niños con superdotación intelectual con problemas escolares y esquizofrenia. Asimismo, el efecto del protocolo utilizado en este estudio está probándose en un ensayo clínico aleatorizado con un amplio número de participantes y estamos desarrollando y poniendo a prueba una intervención online para trastornos emocionales.       

             El material suplementario del artículo puede encontrarse en: https://osf.io/v48r6/. El protocolo completo en español se encuentra en https://osf.io/39db4/, mientras que la traducción al inglés está en https://osf.io/kfb9u/.

Referencias

Ehring, T., & Watkins, E. R. (2008). Repetitive negative thinking as a transdiagnostic process. International Journal of Cognitive Therapy1, 192-205.

Gil, E., Luciano, C., Ruiz, F. J., & Valdivia-Salas, S. (2012). A preliminary demonstration of transformation of functions through hierarchical relations. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 12, 1-20.

Gil-Luciano, B., Calderón-Hurtado, T., Tovar, D., Sebastián, B., & Ruiz, F. J. (en revisión). How are triggers for repetitive negative thinking organized? A relational frame analysis.

Hayes, S. C., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Roche, B. (2001). Relational frame theory. A post-Skinnerian account of human language and cognition. New York: Kluwer Academic Press.

Hayes, S. C., Strosahl, K. D., & Wilson, K. G. (1999). Acceptance and commitment therapy. An experiential approach to behavior change. New York: Guilford Press.

Judd, L. L., Akiskal, H. S., Maser, J. D., Zeller, P. J., Endicott, J., Coryell, W., & Rice, J. A. (1998). Major depressive disorder: A prospective study of residual subthreshold depressive symptoms as predictor of rapid relapse. Journal of Affective Disorders50, 97-108.

Lamers, F., Va Oppen, P., Comijs, H. C., Smit, J. H., Spinhoven, P., Van Balkom, A. J., & Penninx, B. W. (2011). Comorbidity patterns of anxiety and depressive disorders in a large cohort study: The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry72, 341-348.

Luciano, C. (2017). The self and responding to the own’s behavior. Implications of coherence and hierarchical framing. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 17, 267-275.

Ruiz, F. J., Flórez, C. L., García-Martín, M. B., Monroy-Cifuentes, A., Barreto-Montero, K., García-Beltrán, D. M., Riaño-Hernández, D., Sierra, M. A., Suárez-Falcón, J. C., Cardona-Betancourt, V., & Gil-Luciano, B. (2018, en prensa). A multiple-baseline evaluation of a brief acceptance and commitment therapy protocol focused on repetitive negative thinking for moderate emotional disorders. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science.

Ruiz, F. J., Riaño-Hernández, D., Suárez-Falcón, J. C., & Luciano, C. (2016). Effect of a one-session ACT protocol in disrupting repetitive negative thinking: A randomized multiple-baseline design. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 16, 213-233.

Wilson, K. G., & Luciano, C. (2002). Terapia de Aceptación y Compromiso. Un tratamiento conductual orientado a los valores [Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. A values-oriented behabioral treatment]. Madrid: Pirámide.

Wittchen, H. U. (2002). Generalized anxiety disorder: Prevalence, burden, and cost to society. Depression and Anxiety, 16, 162-171.


Entrevista en Blu Radio sobre la ansiedad y el estrés

   96731DFC-940C-4DBD-9BF9-A8E54E4D8F9D

 

Los investigadores principales del Clinik Lab (Laboratorio de Psicología Clínica), el Dr. Francisco J. Ruiz y la Dra. María Belén García-Martín, fueron invitados al programa Luna Blu bajo la dirección del Sr. Juan Jesús Vallejo. En el programa se explicaron las principales características de la ansiedad y el estrés, se hizo la presentación del  Clinik Lab y  de las investigaciones que se realizan en torno a esta temática. Durante el transcurso del programa se resolvieron las dudas de los oyentes.

Aquí puedes escuchar el programa completo.


¿Cómo podemos potenciar el efecto de las metáforas en la Terapia de Aceptación y Compromiso?

 

 

BLOG 2

La Terapia de Aceptación y Compromiso (ACT; Hayes, Strosahl y Wilson, 1999; Wilson y Luciano, 2002) utiliza las metáforas como una herramienta terapéutica central. A pesar de esto, hay escasez de investigación sobre los componentes de las metáforas que pueden maximizar el incremento de  flexibilidad psicológica y el cambio conductual de los consultantes. Para remediar esta situación, el vínculo de ACT con la Teoría del Marco Relacional (RFT; Hayes, Barnes-Holmes y Roche, 2001) puede ayudar a establecer una línea de investigación que identifique dichos componentes y, de este modo, ayudar a mejorar la práctica clínica. 

El equipo de investigación del Clink Lab, en colaboración con la Universidad de Almería y el Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology, ha publicado recientemente un análogo experimental que avanza en esta dirección. La investigación supone un avance sobre un estudio básico en el que se identificó que la inclusión de propiedades físicas comunes en las analogías provocaba un incremento del juicio sobre su idoneidad (Ruiz y Luciano, 2015).

Continuar leyendo "¿Cómo podemos potenciar el efecto de las metáforas en la Terapia de Aceptación y Compromiso?" »


Reduciendo la rumia y preocupación a través de una intervención breve

  Blog1

Reduciendo la rumia y preocupación a través de una intervención breve

Nuestros compañeros del Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology (MICPSY) han realizado un excelente resumen de una reciente publicación que muestra los resultados de una investigación liderada por el Clinik Lab. La investigación tuvo como objetivo probar el efecto de un protocolo de una sesión basado en la Terapia de Aceptación y Compromiso para reducir los niveles de pensamiento negativo repetitivo (rumia y preocupación).

Continuar leyendo "Reduciendo la rumia y preocupación a través de una intervención breve" »


Programa Blu Radio. Ansiedad y Depresión

 

Los investigadores principales del Clinik Lab, el Dr. Francisco J. Ruiz y la Dra. María Belén García-Martín. Fueron invitados al programa Luna Blu bajo la dirección  del Sr. Juan Jesús Vallejo. Ha explicar las principales características de estas afectaciones, la manera en que se mezclan con el día a día de las personas y cómo llegan a afectar las diferentes áreas de su vida. Se respondieron dudad de los oyentes y se invitó a ponerse en contacto con el Clinik Lab sí creía que era necesario. 

Aquí puedes escuchar el programa completo.